Miso Glazed Eggplant & Why I’m Leaving Facebook

Miso Glazed Eggplant & Why I’m Leaving Facebook

I’m sneaking this next recipe in.. just before it starts to really cool down. I think it kind of should have by now, considering that we’re halfway through November. But hey, you certainly won’t find me complaining about the long days of sunshine and warmth. I found these tiny Fairy Tale Eggplants just the other day, and I had to buy them because they were so cute. I really can’t help it. When food is miniature, I fall instantly in love and want to buy eat, eat it and hold it in my hand forever all at once. Eating it usually wins in the end. I decided they should be roasted, with a miso-tahini glaze. Sweet, salty, umami, creamy goodness. Spruced up by some lovely green onions and sesame seeds. Ingredients: 6-8 Fairy tale eggplants, or 2 medium Japanese eggplants 2 Tbsp Miso 3 Tbsp Tahini 2 tsp Mirin A sprinkling of Sea Salt A sprinkling of brown sugar Sesame seeds, black and/or white for garnish Green onions, bias sliced for garnish Directions: 1. Slice eggplants in half lengthwise. Peel if desired. Score the cut half lightly with a knife. Sprinkle with salt and allow to sit, scored side up for about 20-30 minutes. 2. Preheat oven to 400 F. Wipe salt and any liquid accumulation off of the eggplants. Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment and bake for 15-30 minutes. Timing will depend on the size of your eggplants. Bake until they are nicely softened, but watch closely so they don’t burn. 3. While the eggplants are baking, prepare the glaze. In a small bowl, whisk...
Five Meals to Take Camping this Summer.

Five Meals to Take Camping this Summer.

If you follow me on Instagram (ps I love you all!), you may remember me disappearing on a four-day camping trip near Moab, Utah. It was glorious for oh so many reasons, including: lack of internet (yes, it’s good for me to unplug sometimes, even if I don’t want to), good company, cozy campfires every night, slot canyons, sunshine and mountain trails. Oh, and did I mention amazing food?! I want to share with you how easy and simple it can be to pack delicious meals for your next outdoor adventure. Bring a small cooler, and pack the bottom with some dry ice – Why dry ice? It’s relatively inexpensive and it sumblimes (That’s a science word for “evaporates” – so you won’t end up with a swimming pool in your cooler (Not that I speak from experience or anything….). Plus, dry ice is awesome. Just be sure to keep plenty of padding between the ice and your veggies – otherwise they will freeze…. Five Easy Meals to take Camping this Summer 1. Oatmeal (And don’t forget the instant coffee, please). You can buy premade packets of quick-cooking oats in a variety of flavors, or you can buy plain oats, and add in your own favorite toppings. Oatmeal for breakfast = boil water, pour and stir. Voila! Breakfast. We topped our oats with trailmix and dried blueberries. Now that’s called winning at breakfast. 2. Sushi – Why not eat gourmet food on shower-less day #4 in the dessert? Prepare your favorite sushi rolls at home, but don’t slice them. Wrap each roll in seran wrap and then eat them...
Avocado & Parsley Salad Recipe

Avocado & Parsley Salad Recipe

Confession: I’m madly, deeply in love with avocados. In fact, I’m so in love with them that maybe someday, inspired by Pablo Neruda’s Ode to an Artichoke, I can see myself drafting an Ode to Avo. Sooooomeday…Maybe. Or… maybe not. In the meantime, I’ll just keep putting them on everything in site. Today, I felt like cutting differently. I halved, peeled, pitted and punched out avocado pieces with a cookie cutter. And then, I fell even more deeply in love the soft gradient of green to yellow that appeared on these mini circles. Because, some days after cutting, stabbing out the pit, slicing, smashing with a fork, stirring and more smashing, I forget about how delicate avocados can appear. I try to stay consistent with the food I cook most days… I like oats for breakfast when it’s cold out, smoothies for a snack if the sun is shining, and I try to pack a salad every day for my lunch at work. But on the days when I’m cooking at home, I like to get a little lost in it – and slice and dice things my way, however the mood happens to strike. This creativity can get buried in my daily survival food – aka: meals I make everyday to get through the week. Don’t get me wrong, they taste delicious, but when I think about cooking, I think about creating, about having fun with it. Some days that could be a three-course meal for my friends, made with whatever happens to be in the fridge, and some days, it’s just as simple as taking a cookie...
Sunomono – Japanese Cucumber Salad

Sunomono – Japanese Cucumber Salad

Some weeks I get stuck in a salad rut. I rely on the same tired ‘ole veggies on the bottom shelf until they’re almost as tired of me as I am of them. And then… I remember rice vinegar. This is a traditional Japanese quick-pickled cucumber salad. You can get as crazy as you want with the recipe. Craving some heat? Add in some ginger juice or diced chilis. Looking for more color? Add rainbow carrots, red bell peppers, radish slices, maybe even try some cabbage. Whatever veggies you use, be sure to slice as thinly as possible. Ingredients 1 cucumber (Persian or Japanese cucumbers are better, but an English cucumber will work as well) 1/4 tsp sea salt 3 Tbsp rice vinegar 1 Tbsp mirin (or sugar) 1/4 tsp shoyu (soy sauce) 1 tsp black (or white) sesame seeds, toasted Rainbow carrots (or other veggies of choice), optional Directions 1. Thinly slice cucumbers and carrots (if using). Add salt, stir to combine and allow to sit for 5 minutes. Then, squeeze all the liquid from the veggies, and set aside. 2. In a small bowl, mix the rice vinegar, mirin and shoyu together. Stir to combine. If using sugar, mix until all the sugar has dissolved. Taste, and adjust seasonings as desired. Be sure to adjust seasonings as there is quite the variety of shoyu and vinegar available. 3. Add vinegar mixture to cucumbers and carrots and mix well. Stir in sesame seeds. Eat immediately, or store, covered in the fridge for your next salad adventure. If you have leftover dressing, store it in a jar in the...
Cinco de Mayo Pinto Bean Soup with Jicama Salsa

Cinco de Mayo Pinto Bean Soup with Jicama Salsa

Looking to feed a hungry crowd tomorrow, on Cinco de Mayo? Here’s a festive, colorful dish that’s simple to cook, uses one pot (Hello!!?!! ONE pot!!! That’s hardly any dishes at all.), and is bursting with crunchy jicama, cilantro and grilled citrus. Ingredients Pinto Bean Soup 1 Tbsp olive oil 1 small onion, small dice 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 stalks celery, small dice 3 small carrots, peeled and small dice 1/2 tsp sea salt 1 tsp chili powder 1/4 tsp ground cloves 4 c vegetable broth 1 15-ounce can fire roasted tomatoes 3 dried California Chile Peppers (also known as Anaheim), stems and seeds removed 1 tsp dried oregano 3 c cooked pinto beans 1 corn tortilla, torn into small pieces 1 tsp honey, optional, and to taste to balance acidity of tomatoes. May also sub in a vegan sweetener. Salt and pepper to taste 1 avocado, sliced for garnish, optional Cilantro, minced for garnish, optional Jicama Salsa 1 bell pepper, small dice 1 jalapeno, minced 1 small jicama, peeled and small diced 1 lime, cut in half salt and pepper to taste Cilantro to garnish, optional Directions Soup 1. In a large saucepot, heat olive oil over medium heat. Then add onion, garlic, celery and carrots. Add chili powder, sea salt and cloves. Stir well. Saute until vegetables are soft. 2. Add vegetable broth, fire roasted tomatoes and dried California Chiles to the saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and allow soup to simmer 15 minutes, or until the chilies have softened. Then, carefully transfer the soup to a blender and blend until smooth. 3. Return...
Roasted Radicchio with a Balsamic Glaze

Roasted Radicchio with a Balsamic Glaze

Looking for a fancy appetizer or first course to cook up this spring? Look no further. Radicchio (pronounced: rah-DEEK-ee-o) makes for an easy-to-prepare, but looks-elegant-on-your-plate option.  A member of the chicory family, radicchio has crisp leaves and a refreshing but slightly bitter flavor. Roasting the radicchio and topping it off with a drizzle of your favorite balsamic vinegar takes the edge off its bitterness and transforms it into a delightful, warm, wedge salad or first course. The health benefits of including members of the chicory family in our diet are simply awesome. Radicchio is high in fiber, zinc and magnesium and also contains inulin, a compound that helps regulate our blood sugar. The bitter taste in the chicory family comes from a substance known as intybin, a metabolic stimulant  that helps with bile production and hence keep our digestive system healthy and forward moving. Ingredients 1 head radicchio, quartered 2 Tbsp onion, minced (or sub in shallot or leeks) 2 tsp fresh thyme, minced 1 clove garlic, minced 3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp lime juice, freshly squeezed Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/4 c Balsamic Vinegar Microgreens for garnish, optional Directions 1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Quarter the head of radicchio and remove most of the tough inner core. 2. Combine the onion, thyme, garlic, olive oil and lime juice. Whisk thoroughly then add salt and pepper to taste. 3. Toss the quartered radicchio in the dressing to coat, place on a cookie sheet and roast in the oven about 10-15 minutes, turning once halfway through roasting. 4. Place radicchio wedges on a plate,...